Preventative Medicine

Preventative Medicine


Preventive Medicine: The American Board of Preventive Medicine (ABPM) defines the discipline as "that specialty of medical practice which focuses on the health of individuals and defined populations in order to protect, promote, and maintain health and well-being and prevent disease, disability, and premature death."


The aim of preventive medicine is the absence of disease, either by preventing the occurrence of a disease or by halting a disease and averting resulting complications after its onset. Clinicians who work in clinical Preventive Medicine see patients on a daily basis and may provide services in screening, health counseling, and immunization. This can include people with diabetes,smokers,
cardiac patients, and others who can benefit from prevention and lifestyle modification.

General Health & Weight Loss Blood Work & Diagnostics


Comprehensive Metabolic Panel (CMP):

(CMP): A CMP is used as a general screening tool to evaluate organ function and also check for health conditions such as kidney disease, liver disease, and diabetes. A CMP in its entirety also includes a complete blood count (CBC) test and a lipid profile; however, the tests may also be ordered separately.


Complete Blood Count (CBC):

CBC profile is used to assess general health status. There are health conditions that affect blood cells such as anemia, infection, inflammation and cancer.These conditions can be screened and diagnosed with a CBC test.


Vitamin D:

Vitamin D deficiency is associated with many conditions, including bone loss,kidney disease, lung disorders, diabetes, stomach and intestine problems, and cardiovascular disease. Vitamin D test is recommended if a person has symptoms of vitamin D deficiency such as fatigue, bone weakness, and fracture.


High Blood Pressure Screening:

High blood pressure is defined as a repeatedly elevated blood pressure exceeding 130 over 80 mmHg. Persons with high blood pressure often have no symptoms of the condition. Uncontrolled high blood pressure is a risk factor for heart attack, stroke, and congestive heart failure and a major contributing factor to cardiovascular and all- cause mortality. A body of evidence has shown that screening for and treatment of high blood pressure in adults significantly reduces the incidence of cardiovascular diseases.


A body composition analysis is a crucial aspect of a comprehensive weight assessment and overall health determination. Unhealthy or altered body composition may be associated with certain chronic conditions such as obesity and metabolic syndrome. Body composition also impacts an individual’s metabolism. Thus, it is also important to test an individual’s resting metabolic rate in order to determine calorie needs.

WHAT IS PREDIABETES?


Prediabetes is a term used to describe individuals who have blood glucose levels that are just under the range of a type 2 diabetes diagnosis. These individuals are at high risk of developingtype 2 diabetes and are susceptible to diabetes-related health complications, including stroke and cardiovascular disease.


Most people with prediabetes do not have symptoms. In fact, millions of people have it and don’t know it. Symptoms of diabetes include:


  • Unusual thirst
  • Frequent urination
  • Blurred vision
  • Extreme fatigue
  • Frequent infections
  • Cuts/bruises that are slow to heal
  • Tingling/numbness in the hands/feet
  • Recurring skin, gum, or bladder infections



If you are overweight or suffer from any of the mentioned symptoms,
a simple test that measures your hemoglobin A1C level can determine
whether you have prediabetes. This convenient test can be done at
any participating Biocore Health locations.



If you are overweight or suffer from any of the mentioned symptoms,
a simple test that measures your hemoglobin A1C level can determine
whether you have prediabetes. This convenient test can be done at
any participating Biocore Health locations.



Cholesterol Screening

1 in 6 Americans has high cholesterol and does not know it. High cholesterol usually does not have symptoms, and if it goes unchecked, it may increase the risk of serious health conditions such as heart disease and stroke. The lipid panel is typically part of a regular health examination and cholesterol screening. Lipids should be checked at regular intervals in order to monitor changes in this health indicator.


A lipid profile typically includes:


Total Cholesterol:

Measurement of total amount of cholesterol in the blood including low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol and high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol.


High-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C):

Measures the cholesterol in HDL particles; also known as "good cholesterol" because it removes excess cholesterol and carries it to the liver for removal.


Low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C, ‘Bad Cholesterol’):

Measures the cholesterol in LDL particles; also known as "bad cholesterol" because it deposits excess cholesterol in walls of blood vessels, which can lead to cardiovascular diseases.


Triglycerides:

Triglycerides are a type of fat found in the blood that the body uses for energy. Some triglycerides are needed for overall health; however, high triglycerides may raise the risk of heart disease.

METABOLIC SYNDROME SCREENING


Metabolic syndrome is a group of five risk factors that increase the likelihood of developing heart disease, diabetes, and stroke. The five risk factors are:

  • increased blood pressure (greater than 130/85 mmHg)
  • high blood sugar levels (insulin resistance)
  • excess fat around the waist
  • high triglyceride levels
  • low levels of good cholesterol, or HDL


Having one of these risk factors does not mean that you have metabolic syndrome.However, having one will increase your chances of developing cardiovascular disease.Having three or more of these factors will result in a diagnosis of metabolic syndrome and it will increase your risk of health complications.

The American Heart Association (AHA) reports that 23 percent of adults currently have metabolic syndrome.

What are the risk factors for metabolic syndrome?

The risk factors for metabolic syndrome are related to obesity. The two most important risk factors are defined by:

  • central obesity, or excess fat around the middle and upper parts of the body
  • insulin resistance, which makes it difficult for the body to use sugar

There are other factors that can increase your risk for metabolic syndrome.

What are the risk factors for metabolic syndrome?


The risk factors for metabolic syndrome are related to obesity. The two most important risk factors are defined by:

  • Central obesity, or excess fat around the middle and upper parts of the body

  • Insulin resistance, which makes it difficult for the body to use sugar

There are other factors that can increase your risk for metabolic syndrome.



These include:



Age

Family history of metabolic syndrome

Not getting enough exercise

Impulsivity – Disorders like OCD affect 3.3 million; the CDC also reports 11% of school-age kids suffer from ADD, while it affects 4% of adults

Women who have been diagnosed with polycystic ovary syndrome




STRESS MANAGEMENT




Stress management helps patients identify their stress triggers and develop effective coping strategies to manage. Chronic stress is associated with many unhealthy behaviors such as smoking, unhealthy eating, alcoholism, and inadequate sleep.Maintaining a healthy lifestyle can help manage stress.

ACTIVITY ASSESSMENT

It is important to help patients understand that exercise is a vital aspect of achieving and maintaining a healthy lifestyle. A physical activity assessment addresses how to make individualized fitness recommendations based on patient’s health and exercise preference. According to the American College of Sports Medicine (ACSM) recommendations,adults should get at least 150 minutes of moderate-intensity exercise per week.

SLEEP HEALTH

Sleep is an integral aspect of a healthy lifestyle. Sleep health encourages patients to engage in healthy behaviors that lead to improved quality of sleep.